Call For Papers – Special Issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society on Fat Oppression

Special Issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society on Fat Oppression, edited by Ariane Prohaska and Jeannine A. Gailey

To be considered for inclusion in this special issue, please send a 200-250 word abstract and a current CV to Ariane Prohaska (aprohaska@ua.edu) or Jeannine Gailey (j.gailey@tcu.edu) by December 15th, 2017.  Any questions about the topic can also be directed to these e-mails.

This special issue of Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society explores issues around fat oppression. The editors invite papers on a variety of topics that address, for example, fatness as a dimension of inequality (e.g. discrimination in jobs, education, and public spaces) that intersects with other inequalities (race, class, gender, ability, sexuality, etc.), the theorizing of fat/fatness or “obesity” as deviant and the consequences on the physical/mental health of fat people, and violence against fat people.

Potential topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Stereotypes of fat people and their consequences
  • Fat children: bullying, stigma, and outcomes
  • Intimate partner violence and fat bodies
  • Fat oppression in medicine/pharmaceutical industry
  • Sexual assault/rape of fat bodies
  • Media representations of fat people
  • The history of fat oppression
  • Public policy and fat bodies
  • The diet industry and fat bodies
  • Fat activism
  • Resilience in the face of fat oppression

Final submissions should be between 3000-6000 words, including all notes and references, and should be received by April 1, 2018. If you wish to include reproductions of visual images with your essay, you will need to receive permission to do so from the artists/copyright holders of the image(s).  All authors will need to sign a form that transfers copyright of their article to the publisher, Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

Fat Studies is the first academic journal in the field of scholarship that critically examines theory, research, practices, and programs related to body weight and appearance. Content includes original research and overviews exploring the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, sexuality, age, ability, and socioeconomic status. Articles critically examine representations of fat in health and medical sciences, the Health at Every Size model, the pharmaceutical industry, psychology, sociology, cultural studies, legal issues, literature, pedagogy, art, theater, popular culture, media studies, and activism.


Fat Studies
 is an interdisciplinary, international field of scholarship that critically examines societal attitudes and practices about body weight and appearance. Fat Studies advocates equality for all people regardless of body size. It explores the way fat people are oppressed, the reasons why, who benefits from that oppression and how to liberate fat people from oppression. Fat Studies seeks to challenge and remove the negative associations that society has about fat and the fat body. It regards weight, like height, as a human characteristic that varies widely across any population. Fat Studies is similar to academic disciplines that focus on race, ethnicity, gender, or age.

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Call for Papers: Visual Fat Studies

Attention Fattitude Fans: Call for Papers – Visual Fat Studies

FKW // Zeitschrift für Geschlechterforschung und visuelle Kultur

No. 62, Spring 2017, Submission deadline: October 20, 2016

In 2030, almost half of all Europeans will be fat — according to the striking yet simplistic forecast issued by the WHO at the 2015 European Congress on Obesity in Prague. For some time, the message has spread in the Global North that obesity, adiposity, overweight, etc. threaten to deform the healthy (i.e., slim) nation’s body like a contagious virus. Read More

Fattitude’s Viri needs Your Help…

About 7 years ago I got my hands on a road bike thanks to a friend who introduced me to this wondrous vessel as the best way to see the world. I had just gotten to Florida to start grad school and riding up and down the coast became my escape, my inspiration and my training grounds to admire what my body was capable of. I’ve always had a bigger body on my bike then the Tour de Francer’s whizzing by, but that didn’t take anything away from my riding experience. I still reach break spots to say hi and I still complete my 30, 40, 60 and more, mile goals. Read More

Dr. Oz’s Hippocratic Oath: The Ethics of the Magic, Miracles and Breakthroughs of “America’s Doctor”

Dr. Oz’s Hippocratic Oath: The Ethics of the Magic, Miracles and Breakthroughs of “America’s Doctor”

By Adrienne Guckenberger

I grew up watching the Oprah Winfrey Show. As a young girl struggling with body image issues, I remember tuning in everyday, at 4 p.m., with my grandmother. Oprah had a lifelong struggle with her weight, and I identified with that. Whatever she promoted, I bought into—whether it was her book club, working out, new diets, fashion trends or health suggestions—Oprah was our guru, and whatever she said I gullibly believed.

Hook, line and sinker. Read More

Open Casting Call: Don’t Talk To Irene

 

Greetings Fattitude Fans!

We were asked to share an open casting call for a brand new feature film by writer/director Pat Mills, “Don’t Talk to Irene”.

It’s a body positive story (dark comedy meets teen dance movie) that should be a lot of fun!

The filmmakers are currently seeking their lead actress – could it be you or someone you know?

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